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EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

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EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Mon Jul 03, 2017 9:10 pm

North Korea launches missile, nearing Japanese waters
http://www.cnbc.com/2017/07/03/north-ko ... ports.html

North Korea launched a missile on Tuesday, with Japan saying it appeared to have landed in Japan's exclusive economic zone (EEZ), Reuters reported.

North Korea launched a missile on Tuesday, with Japan saying it appeared to have landed in Japan's exclusive economic zone (EEZ), Reuters reported.

On its website, South Korean state news agency Yonhap cited South Korea's military as saying it was an unidentified ballistic missile, launched from a location near the North's border with China at 9:40 a.m. local time.

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in ordered a National Security Council meeting after the launch, the Blue House, the South's equivalent of the White House, said, according to Yonhap.

The meeting was to determine the country's defense readiness against further incidents, Yonhap said.

Japan said there were no reports of damage from the missile, which flew for 40 minutes, Reuters reported.

Japan said it strongly protested the launch and that provocative actions from North Korea couldn't be tolerated, Reuters reported.

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North Korea fires four missiles into sea near Japan
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/ ... a-of-japan

Japan warns of security threat after three of four ballistic missiles land in its exclusive economic zone

Japan has lodged a protest and warned of grave threats to its security after North Korea launched four ballistic missiles on Monday morning, three of which fell into Japanese waters.

The exact type of missile fired was not immediately clear, but South Korea’s military said it was unlikely that they were intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM), which can reach the US. An unnamed US official told Reuters that the US saw no indications that an ICBM had been tested.

According to the military in Seoul, the North fired the unidentified projectiles shortly after 7.30am local time (2230 GMT Sunday) from the Tongchang-ri region near its border with China. The area is home to the North’s Seohae satellite station, where it has conducted banned long-range rocket launches in recent years.
The Guardian view on North Korea: Pyongyang’s advantage
Editorial: While Kim Jong-un’s regime has hacked other countries, US attempts to damage his nuclear programme face tough challenges
Read more

“The latest launches of ballistic missiles clearly demonstrate evidence of a new threat from North Korea,” the Japanese prime minister, Shinzo Abe, said. “The launches are clearly in violation of [UN] security council resolutions. It is an extremely dangerous action.”

The missiles flew about 620 miles (1,000km) before landing in the Sea of Japan – known as the East Sea in Korea – with three landing in Japan’s “exclusive economic zone”. A fourth splashed down just outside the EEZ.

Three of the missiles landed 186-217 miles (300-350km) from the Oga peninsula in Japan’s Akita prefecture, according to the country’s defence minister, Tomomi Inada.

Japan’s chief cabinet secretary, Yoshihide Suga, called the latest missile launch a “grave threat to national security” but added that there were no reports of damage to ships or aircraft in the area.

South Korea’s acting president Hwang Kyo-ahn said the launches were a direct challenge to the international community.

The US also condemned the launch, vowing that Washington was ready to “use the full range of capabilities at our disposal against this growing threat”.

“The United States strongly condemns the DPRK’s ballistic missile launches tonight, which violate UN security council resolutions explicitly prohibiting North Korea’s launches using ballistic missile technology,” the State Department’s acting spokesman, Mark Toner, said in a statement.

He added: “We remain prepared – and will continue to take steps to increase our readiness – to defend ourselves and our allies from attack, and are prepared to use the full range of capabilities at our disposal against this growing threat.”

North Korea conducted two nuclear tests and 20 missile launches last year – a sign, say experts, that the country’s leader, Kim Jong-un, is redoubling efforts to develop a nuclear arsenal capable of deterring “hostility” from the US and South Korea.

In his New Year’s address, Kim claimed that the North was preparing to test fire an ICBM – a development that would dramatically raise the diplomatic and security stakes for Washington.

The US defence secretary, James Mattis, warned last month that any nuclear attack on the US or its allies in the Asia-Pacific would trigger an “effective and overwhelming” response.

North Korea has carried out five nuclear tests and dozens of missile launches despite six rounds of UN sanctions that began after Pyongyang’s first nuclear test in 2006.

Concern is growing that with every new test, North Korea is edging towards developing a fully functioning ICBM that, in theory, could strike the US mainland.

Donald Trump’s administration has yet to publicly articulate its policy towards North Korea beyond voicing support for its alliances with Japan and South Korea, home to tens of thousands of US troops. The US president has previously described North Korea as a “big, big problem”.

Monday’s tests were the second North Korea has conducted since Trump became president. Early last month, it test-launched a new intermediate-range missile – known as the Pukguksong-2, into the sea to coincide with Trump’s summit with Abe at his Florida estate.

“Not only Pukguksong-2 but newer independent strategic weapons will fly high vigorously in the sky off the ground as long as the United States and the puppet regime are going ahead with their nuclear threat to us and an exercise for invasion war against the North,” North Korea’s Rodong Sinmun newspaper, the mouthpiece of the ruling Workers’ party, said in a commentary last week.

Monday’s launches are believed to be in protest at the start last week of huge joint military exercises involving South Korea and the US that North Korea regards as a rehearsal for an invasion. Pyongyang threatened to take “strong retaliatory measures” after the annual military drills began last Wednesday but did not elaborate.

Kim ordered troops to “set up thorough countermeasures of a merciless strike against the enemy’s sudden air assault”, the state-run Korean Central News Agency said.

South Korea and the US insist that the Foal Eagle exercises, which will end in late April, are designed to test the allies’ preparedness for a serious military provocation from North Korea.

The launches could also be designed to communicate Pyongyang’s anger towards China, coming as Xi Jinping attended the 10-day annual national people’s congress in Beijing.

While China is the North’s only main ally and biggest donor and trading partner, Beijing has not attempted to hide its opposition to Pyongyang’s nuclear ambitions.

Last month, China announced a suspension of all coal imports from North Korea until the end of the year, depriving Pyongyang of an important source of foreign currency.

On Monday China’s foreign ministry said Beijing opposed the missile launch but noted that it had taken place as the US and South Korea were holding “large-scale military exercises targeting North Korea”. “All sides should exercise restraint and not do anything to irritate each other to worsen regional tensions,” a spokesman added.

Xinhua, China’s official news agency, urged China, Japan, North Korea, Russia, South Korea, and the US “to go back to the negotiating table to end wrangles and wrestles and reopen the long stalled six-party talks that once brought the Korean Peninsula nearest to denuclearisation with a settlement acceptable to all”.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby 3ADScout » Tue Jul 04, 2017 4:17 pm

I figured out how to get China to control N. Korea, just tell China the US will support Taiwan's development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby PatrioticStabilist » Tue Jul 04, 2017 5:00 pm

Son and family are scheduled to leave December or January, I wish it were now. He will be going to
Fort Drum, New York to support the 10th Mountain Division.

Since she is from Siberia and they have lived in Korea so long, don't think the weather will bother
them much.

Happy 4th to everyone.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby Drakenstead1 » Tue Jul 04, 2017 5:53 pm

Mrs Drak & myself have had several discussions on the topic of the NKs and what they might do. We've actually come to the conclusion that what they might do is anything. Their "Dear Leader" is a twisted nut case of the first order and us thus totally unpredictable. G K Chesterton is noted for saying (I paraphrase somewhat here)
That we say of a mad man that he has lost his mind when in actuality his mind (ie: reason) is the only thing that he has kept.
Everything else that makes us human from empathy & compassion to understanding of the long term consequences of actions and considerations of the effects on others goes by the wayside.

What I am concerned by is the possibility that our current leadership might fall into the same trap. To react to crazy public statements and threats with a strike on what is basically a third world out house hole full of starving and beaten down people could have civilization ending consequences. What the Chinese might do if we strike has the potential to allow many of us to see exactly how helpful and effective our preps could be. The Chinese very well might see themselves backed into a corner with no alternative but to hit us or lose control at home due to some of the more war like factions of their own. Right now their strategy seems to be one of gradual efforts to out strip us economically and to expand their influence in Central Asia & the South China Sea. I believe we can deal with this but if they believe that they are threatened things could easily get out of hand. Our military right now is at it's lowest state of readiness in generations. It would be ill advised to poke the Dragon in the eye until we have forged a remedy to that situation lest the Russian Bear be allowed to pick up the pieces in the aftermath.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:48 pm

Analysis: North Korea missile launch raises the stakes in a big way. What now?
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/201 ... 450026001/

(VIDEO of launch at link, above)

North Korea’s successful launch of a missile that for the first time could reach the U.S. mainland ratchets up the pressure on President Trump and other world leaders to resolve a growing nuclear crisis with no easy solution.

The test launch came on the Fourth of July, and just three days before a Group of 20 summit convenes in Hamburg, Germany. The timing is almost certainly not coincidental. North Korea uses such occasions to call attention to its provocative acts — and its test elevates the urgency with which Trump and U.S. allies may feel compelled to respond. Hours after the North Korean launch, the Eighth U.S. Army and South Korean military fired surface-to-surface missiles into South Korean waters in a demonstration of capability, the U.S. Army said in a statement.

Trump has repeatedly called on China to rein in its neighbor and close ally. China on Tuesday suggested a compromise: North Korea would stop missile tests if the United States and South Korea scaled back military exercises in the region.

Wednesday evening, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson confirmed the intercontinental ballistic missile launch and called it a “new escalation” of the threat. He vowed to bring additional international pressure on the regime.

“The United States seeks only the peaceful denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and the end of threatening actions by North Korea. As we, along with others, have made clear, we will never accept a nuclear-armed North Korea,” Tillerson said in a statement. “Global action is required to stop a global threat. Any country that hosts North Korean guest workers, provides any economic or military benefits, or fails to fully implement UN Security Council resolutions is aiding and abetting a dangerous regime. All nations should publicly demonstrate to North Korea that there are consequences to their pursuit of nuclear weapons.”

Trump has said he would be willing to try the diplomatic route, and even agreed to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un face-to-face. Prior diplomatic overtures by two U.S. presidents, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, proved failures when the North reneged on the agreements.

North Korea appears intent on developing a nuclear-tipped missile that could hit the United States, saying it needs such a deterrent to prevent a U.S. attack aimed at overthrowing the regime.

Trump, who has vowed to stop Kim from developing such a weapon, faces a thorny problem. If he orders an attack on North Korea now, he might be able to halt or delay its nuclear and missile programs but could potentially unleash a larger conflict on the Korean Peninsula.

North Korea has a 1.2-million-member military, and Seoul, the capital of U.S. ally South Korea, sits just 35 miles from the demilitarized zone marking the border. Conventional weapons — including rockets, missiles and artillery — could still devastate South Korea even if the U.S. military destroyed North Korea’s nuclear sites. That leaves 25 million South Koreans vulnerable, along with 28,000 U.S. troops stationed there.

“Then you get into a situation where the United States has started a war with large-scale South Korean casualties,” said Malcolm Chalmers, deputy director-general of the Royal United Services Institute for Defense and Security Studies in London. “Even if you could be assured you take out all the nuclear and missile capabilities, North Korea also has significant conventional retaliatory capabilities. That could turn parts of Seoul into Aleppo (Syria), and that’s the fear.”

Trump has been talking tough on North Korea, a sharp contrast from President Obama, who appeared reluctant to further exacerbate tensions verbally. Instead, Obama pushed for international sanctions to squeeze North Korea economically.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:52 pm

A look at the US defense capabilities to handle threat of North Korean missile
http://abcnews.go.com/US/us-defense-cap ... d=48433772

A U.S. official confirmed today that North Korea has launched a two-stage intercontinental ballistic missile. This is the first successfully test-fired ICBM for North Korea, which has been attempting to build a missile that can reach the U.S. mainland.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said in March that "all options are on the table" to deal with the escalating threat North Korea poses.

The Department of Defense has an extensive missile defense system designed to help protect against a missile attack from that country.

Ground-based midcourse defense system (VIDEO at link, above)

The ground-based midcourse defense system is designed to counter a North Korean missile threat, including ICBMs, which a minimum range of 3,400 miles. North Korea has stated openly that it wants to develop an ICBM capable of striking the United States mainland with a nuclear weapon.

In May the U.S. conducted the ground-based intercept system's first test against an ICBM-class target. The interceptor was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and the ICBM target was launched from Kwajalein Atoll, part of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific. The result: The ICBM was intercepted, which was likened to firing a bullet and hitting another bullet.

"This system is vitally important to the defense of our homeland, and this test demonstrates that we have a capable, credible deterrent against a very real threat," said Vice Adm. Jim Syring, the director of the Missile Defense Agency at the time.

There are 36 ground-based interceptors at two military bases in the U.S. — 32 at Fort Greely in Alaska and four at Vandenberg.

The THAAD system
Differing from the ground-based interceptor, the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system intercepts and destroys short- and midrange ballistic missiles before on their descent, or terminal approach.

The THAAD system operates by using hit-to-kill technology and consists of missile batteries coordinated by a radar and tracking system.

A THAAD system was recently deployed in South Korea.

Aegis ballistic missile defense

The Aegis ballistic missile defense is the Navy part of the Missile Defense Agency's defense system. Though not designed to defeat ICBMs, Aegis ballistic missile defense ships can track ICBMs and provide fire control data to the ground-based interceptors in Alaska and California.

Navy destroyers and cruisers equipped with the system carry interceptor missiles capable of targeting an ICBM shortly after launch.

US troops and carriers

The U.S. has 28,500 troops permanently stationed in South Korea and 54,000 troops in Japan.

In Japan the U.S. Navy has stationed destroyers and cruisers capable of destroying missiles launched from North Korea.

The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan, in Yokosuka, Japan, frequently conducts patrols throughout the Pacific. While not a part of the ballistic missile defense system, its presence in the Sea of Japan is meant to deter provocations by North Korea.

The carrier is currently participating in a regional exercise off Australia's east coast.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:58 pm

Image
Statement by Secretary Tillerson
https://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks ... 272340.htm

Press Statement
Rex W. Tillerson
Secretary of State
Washington, DC
July 4, 2017

The United States strongly condemns North Korea's launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile. Testing an ICBM represents a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region, and the world.

Global action is required to stop a global threat. Any country that hosts North Korean guest workers, provides any economic or military benefits, or fails to fully implement UN Security Council resolutions is aiding and abetting a dangerous regime. All nations should publicly demonstrate to North Korea that there are consequences to their pursuit of nuclear weapons. We intend to bring North Korea's provocative action before the UN Security Council and enact stronger measures to hold the DPRK accountable.

The United States seeks only the peaceful denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula and the end of threatening actions by North Korea. As we, along with others, have made clear, we will never accept a nuclear-armed North Korea.

The President and his national security team are continuing to assess the situation in close coordination with our allies and partners.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Tue Jul 04, 2017 10:06 pm

U.S. says North Korea's ICBM launch is 'a new escalation of the threat to the United States' and the world
http://www.latimes.com/world/la-fg-nort ... story.html

A photo distributed by the North Korean government shows what is said to be the launch of a Hwasong-14 intercontinental ballistic missile in North Korea on July 4. (North Korea)

Six months ago, North Korea’s dynastic leader, Kim Jong Un, announced in clear terms his nation’s resolve to develop a ballistic missile capable of reaching the continental United States.

Such an accomplishment would surely shift the power dynamic in Northeast Asia — and help cement the government’s long-sought status as a nuclear state.

It appears Kim may have gotten his wish.

North Korea announced Tuesday that it had, at long last, test-launched an intercontinental ballistic missile — a “glistening miracle,” as state news described it.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson condemned what he acknowledged was an ICBM test, saying the launch represents "a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region and the world."

The news means an already intractable problem posed by Pyongyang’s advancing nuclear and missile programs just became more difficult for the United States and its regional allies.

“It’s really, really significant from a technological and political standpoint,” said Melissa Hanham, a senior research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in California who studies North Korea’s missile program.

American and South Korean officials, while confirming the event and expressing concern, said in their initial assessments that the missile appeared to be somewhat less capable than North Korea announced.

Tillerson called upon all nations to publicly stand together against North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons — as diplomats from the United States, Japan and South Korea requested an emergency U.N. Security Council meeting to discuss the launch.

"Global action is required to stop a global threat," Tillerson said in a statement. "Any country that hosts North Korean guest workers, provides any economic or military benefits, or fails to fully implement U.N. Security Council resolutions is aiding and abetting a dangerous regime."

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley and her counterparts from Japan and South Korea called for a Security Council meeting Wednesday.

"As we, along with others, have made clear: We will never accept a nuclear-armed North Korea," Tillerson said.

The U.S. Army and South Korea military conducted a combined missile exercise Tuesday as a show of force in response to North Korea’s test.

Multiple Hyunmoo-2 missiles, capable of striking any target in North Korea, were blasted from launchers along South Korea's eastern coastline into the South’s territorial waters. The exercise took place within 10 miles of the demilitarized zone separating North and South.

“The deep strike precision capability enables the [South Korean]-U.S. alliance to engage the full array of time critical targets under all weather conditions," the U.S. Army said in a statement.

The initial questions about North Korea’s claim appeared to be about the performance and range of the missile — not the fact that Pyongyang had significantly improved its capability. By any measure, the missile appeared to be the longest-range military device North Korea has tested.

The apparently successful test wasn’t a surprise for security analysts and military officials like Hanham, who were watching in the fall when North Korea suffered two mysterious and explosive missile failures at the same launch facility.

North Korea has also recently released images from rocket engine tests and displayed what appeared to be several intercontinental ballistic missiles at a massive military parade in Pyongyang this spring. The government has accelerated the pace of its missile testing program in recent years under Kim, a grandson of Kim Il Sung, the nation’s late communist patriarch.

But the new capability — a clear violation of Security Council resolutions — seems to have crossed a psychological threshold. It already has led to widespread alarm that other, shorter-range ballistic missile tests this year haven’t provoked.

“Politically, it’s a game changer,” said Go Myong-hyun, a research fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies in Seoul.

Tuesday’s test, conducted about 9:40 a.m. from Banghyon airfield near the northwestern town of Kusong, was North Korea's 12th and most significant launch this year.

North Korean media released images of a smiling Kim, who reportedly watched the test nearby on a panel of computer monitors. Other images showed the leader surrounded by celebrating military commanders.

The device, which North Korea called the Hwasong-14, flew on a trajectory more than 1,700 miles into the atmosphere — farther than the International Space Station — for about 40 minutes. It landed more than 500 miles east, in the Sea of Japan, which Koreans call the East Sea.

In theory, the missile’s range could have allowed it to reach Alaska on a flatter trajectory, though such a flight path would have introduced other technical complexities and physical hurdles for the North’s scientists.

Still, it’s a significant accomplishment for the government. “When I heard it was a 40-minute flight,” Hanham said, “my stomach just dropped.”

Newly elected South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who recently discussed North Korea at a summit with President Trump in Washington, convened an emergency security meeting. He also called on the international community to “take action.”

But for South Korea and the United States, which has 28,000 troops on the Korean peninsula, a list of bad options for slowing or stopping North Korea now appears even more limited.

Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programs have perplexed the last three American presidents. They have tried negotiation, economic aid, international sanctions, diplomatic pressure and even covert action.

The strategies have failed. Experts now believe North Korea is an established nuclear state with more than a dozen devices. A key question had been whether the government could deliver its weapons globally.

Experts believe North Korea needs more time to miniaturize its warheads so that they can be launched on missiles. And scientists there still would need to figure out how to get the warheads to safely and accurately reenter the atmosphere en route to a target.

Still, the aim of long-range delivery now appears within sight despite Trump’s pre-inauguration tweet in January vowing, “It won’t happen!”

The Trump administration has announced a new policy of imposing “maximum pressure” on North Korea, calling for sanctions but also dialogue if the regime ends its program. The administration has left open the possibility of a military strike, but that could prove catastrophic.

North Korea, for example, could retaliate with its masses of conventional weapons, such as artillery, along the border that is about 40 miles from Seoul, a metropolitan area of more than 20 million residents.

Some believe the United States and other countries that have concerns about North Korea's nuclear and missile programs should negotiate a freeze on testing and perhaps a return of international inspectors to North Korean laboratories.

With all the focus on missiles lately, it's easy to forget that the North could perform its sixth underground nuclear detonation test any day — another provocation that would further increase the sense of crisis in the region, said John Delury, a North Korea expert at Yonsei University in Seoul.

“There are some diplomatic options — they’re not great — but they're probably what we should do,” he said.

Trump had hoped that China — North Korea’s only significant trading partner — would help solve the problem. But in recent weeks his administration has grown frustrated with what it claims is a lack of pressure by Beijing on Pyongyang, concerns Trump reportedly expressed in a phone call with Chinese President Xi Jinping this week.

“Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!” Trump tweeted after the launch.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang insisted China has already made “relentless efforts” to stem North Korea's nuclear ambitions. And he repeated China's usual refrain, calling for a stop to actions that violate United Nations resolutions but emphasizing a need for calm and restraint.

Some question whether there’s much more that can be done by China, which also fears that a leadership change in Pyongyang could lead to a North Korean refugee crisis or even a unified Korea that counts the United States as an ally.

“Even if you cancel most of the trade between China and North Korea, I think Kim Jong Un would still be determined to do these nuclear activities,” said Shi Yinhong, an international relations professor at People’s University in Beijing. “I think the problem from China’s perspective is quite serious. And the issue is that China still can’t find a way out of this predicament.”

China announced in February that it would ban North Korean coal imports for the rest of 2017, in line with United Nations sanctions. Yet visitors to the China-North Korea border have witnessed coal trucks crossing, casting doubt on the ban’s efficacy, and China's trade with North Korea grew nearly 40% in the first quarter of the year, according to Chinese official figures.

North Korea announced Tuesday’s launch on state television, using a familiar news anchor seen in other major announcements, a middle-aged woman in a pink hanbok, the traditional Korean dress.

“The success of the last stage of becoming a nuclear power state is developing an intercontinental ballistic missile,” she read in a booming cadence familiar to North Korea watchers.

Her report added that the test shows the “unwithering power of our state, our strong independence and defense in the world, and will be marked as a significant mark in our history.”

The announcement came after a nearly 30-minute montage featuring soaring socialist songs and patriotic imagery, including panoramas of the Pyongyang skyline and Mt. Paektu, a volcano included in the country’s national emblem.

The montage also briefly included a soaring missile, which perhaps has now given North Korea an advantage it might retain for some time.

“At this point, it’s no longer about denuclearizing the Korean peninsula,” Hanham said. “Now it’s just about containing North Korea as best we can.”
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby Mollypup » Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:59 am

Well............

The world powers hee hawed around for gee I dunno HOW LONG?? And now NK has missile capable of reaching the US. I am so stunned :shock: :eek:

Not.

The United State's most outstanding weakness is in underestimating it's enemy. omg :thumbdown:
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby NJMike » Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:22 am

My new motto on this- Hope for the best, prepare for the war.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby farmer_dude48 » Wed Jul 05, 2017 10:46 am

NJMike wrote:My new motto on this- Hope for the best, prepare for the war.


:thumbup: :thumbup: :tank:
" Doing what I can with what I got " Mr. Burt Gummer
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:33 am

NJMike wrote:My new motto on this- Hope for the best, prepare for the war.


U.S. tells North Korea it is prepared to go to war
http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017 ... o-war.html

The U.S. warned North Korea that it is ready to fight if provoked, as Pyongyang claimed another weapons-development breakthrough following its launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile a day earlier.

The regime, having demonstrated its capacity to reach the U.S. with a missile, on Wednesday touted another achievement of the test launch: It claimed that its missile warhead--the forward section, which carries the explosive--can withstand the extreme heat and pressure of re-entering the earth's atmosphere.

If true--the claim couldn't be independently verified--that would clear another hurdle in developing a nuclear-tipped missile that can reach American cities.

As tensions between Washington and Pyongyang rose, Gen. Vincent Brooks, the top American military commander in South Korea, said in a statement Wednesday that the U.S. and South Korea are prepared to go to war with the North if given the order.

"Self restraint, which is a choice, is all that separates armistice and war," Gen. Brooks said. "We are able to change our choice when so ordered....It would be a grave mistake for anyone to believe anything to the contrary."

Earlier in the day, allied armies conducted a rare live-fire drill, launching tactical surface-to-surface missiles off the east coast of Korea--an action they said was aimed directly at "countering North Korea's destabilizing and unlawful actions on July 4."

The drill and tough language appeared meant to reassure Seoul after North Korea's successful ICBM test, a significant advance.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson described the development as an escalation of the threat to the U.S. It came despite years of sanctions and warnings aimed at preventing Kim Jong Un's regime from reaching the milestone.

Washington has considered military action against North Korea, but pulling the trigger presents serious risks. Seoul, a city of 10 million, sits just 35 miles from the North Korean border, where Pyongyang has assembled artillery that could inflict devastating damage on the densely populated South Korean capital.

"A single volley could deliver more than 350 metric tons of explosives across the South Korean capital, roughly the same amount of ordnance dropped by 11 B-52 bombers," said a report published last year by Austin, Texas-based geopolitical consultancy Stratfor.

If attacked by the U.S., North Korea would also likely fire on U.S. ally Japan, which is within range of many of Pyongyang's missiles. During one launch in March the North fired four missiles at once toward Japan, which some analysts interpreted as a warning that it could overwhelm any Japanese missile defense.

Meredith Sumpter, director of Asia for Eurasia Group, wrote in a note to clients Tuesday that the odds of a U.S. military strike on North Korea remain low--about a 10% probability--adding it would probably be well-signaled by the U.S. and "clear to outside observers in advance of any military move."

A report published Wednesday in North Korea's official state media said the warhead its missile carried Tuesday maintained a steady temperature and held its structure even "during the harshest atmospheric re-entry environment."

For a missile to cross the Pacific Ocean, it must exit and then re-enter the atmosphere. Re-entry puts incredible stress on the warhead.

The United Nations Security Council is scheduled to hold a meeting on North Korea later Wednesday, following a request from Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who has called for more dialogue and closer economic ties with North Korea, said Wednesday that the time had passed for simply issuing statements in response to the North's "serious provocation."

"We must show North Korea the strength of our resolve with our missile-launch exercise," Mr. Moon said, according to his spokesman.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Wed Jul 05, 2017 11:43 am

VIDEO:

Glenn Beck - The very real danger of an EMP attack on America
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8g2e3ITEWM

Published on May 15, 2017

Glenn Beck from TheBlaze outlines the danger of an EMP attack on America by North Korea and how to best prepare for an event where 90% of our nation's population would die in one year. With an electromagnetic pulse, refrigeration stops. All computer chips would be fried. The electrical power grid would collapse. Life as we know it stops. There are ways you can prepare, today.
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby ReadyMom » Wed Jul 05, 2017 12:04 pm

North Korea has really dominated the news, today. I can't help but think that if it is making the news, like this, then it's probably worse than what we (the public) know.

Am I being too paranoid? This situation is not sitting well on my stomach.

Just HOW READY are they to setting off an EMP strike? Do we have as long as other who write about this say? Are they right that they aren't close to success yet? Seems yesterday WAS a success. What else do they have tucked away? Or were they just lucky on this launch?

Did you see the path of yesterday's launch? It *could* have EASILY hit Alaska!. Then, I'm sure we'd have war. :bored: -
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Re: EMP-Korea Concerns & Discussions #4 (JULY 2017)

Postby rickdun » Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:13 pm

RM, I don't think you're paranoid, I think most people are just a lot more concerned about what North Korea may do. With that being said I picked up another 50 lb of beans and rice on Monday and I ordered more freezed dried beef and chicken, maybe I'm paranoid.

The government will never tell the citizens everything they know, would create a big panic. Can you imagine the government coming out and saying that North Korea's 2 satalites are armed with an EMP and can be launched at any minute, citizens would go wild.

If the little fat kid does try to hit the U.S., it will be all out nuclear war and millions will die. There about 10 million people living in Seoul South Korea alone. :shakeno:
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