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Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor"

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Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor"

Postby TaffyJ » Wed Oct 06, 2010 7:45 pm

So, I had ordered this book from the Hesperian Foundation, Where there is no Doctor. I am reading it and am both reassured and appalled at how things are. This book is written for villagers in developing areas (3rd world) where there is no doctor or hospital, or where care is too expensive or just impossible for some reason.

The good part is that most illnesses can be prevented by three things: nutrition of good quality and quantity, clean drinking water, and careful sanitation practices. Other topics covered are chronic illness, injury, infection, parasites, and care of women/infants/children/childbirth.

It is at the same time a relief to see how well our society is able to care for health issues right now, and how much life will change when there are no longer medicines or vaccinations.

This book is written in simple, sometimes crude language so that an uneducated villager can make use of it, possibly even a person who has limited English. The drawings are graphic, and may disturb some of delicate sensibilities. All in all, it seems a very useful text for what we may face, expecially to those of us who feel we do not have time to go to school and get medical training before TSHTF. Throughout the book, the author warns there are conditions for which professional medical help is necessary. It is more about prevention, and what to do if there is an emergency, but no professional help is possible.

It is available from Amazon, and there are related titles like Where there is no Dentist, and Where Women have no Doctor. The books are not very expensive, and could be of great use.
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby TheLight » Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:09 pm

They are available for free via the Hesperian Foundation in PDf form:
http://www.hesperian.org/publications_download.php

Titles available for free download are:
A Community Guide to Environmental Health
Where There Is No Doctor
Where Women Have No Doctor

A Book for Midwives
A Health Handbook for Women with Disabilities
Disabled Village Children
HIV Health and Your Community
Helping Children Who Are Deaf
Helping Children Who Are Blind
A Worker's Guide to Health and Safety
Cholera Prevention Fact Sheet
Sanitation and Cleanliness for a Healthy Environment
Water for life
Pesticides are poison
Safe Handling of Health Care Waste
Women's Health Exchange
Global Health Watch 2005-2006
Global Health Watch 2
Where There Is No Dentist
The Story of Stuff with Annie Leonard
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby mrduke » Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:15 pm

taffyj i have downloaded wheres theres no doctor/ dentest, both are good book it have on the shelfs, also, emergacy war surgry, and the special forces medical handbook, plues ditch medicine, also eveyone should have a copy of grays anatomy and a more recent copy of the PDR, there are a bunch of good medical books out there for not a lot of monie if bought used, but i thank thoughs mentiond above are good basic ones to have and start with,
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby TaffyJ » Wed Oct 06, 2010 8:33 pm

Its great they can be downloaded for free. However, I wanted a bound hardcopy for storage on a bookshelf. It won't do me any good if its in the puter and there is no power.

My comment on the book was also one of ignorance. Sometimes when I learn new things, it makes me realize just how much I didn't know. Other than basic hand washing and bandaids and neosporin, I am somewhat clueless as far as medical care. Right now, my children are all up to date with their vaccinations, food is easy to come by, clean water comes with the turn of a knob, and sanitation is as easy as a flush. It is frightening to me thinking of how easily all that could change. Still, comforting that I don't need 8 years in med school to live, if I can only follow some basic rules. Problem is, getting others to follow sanitation and hand washing too.

As far as injury and emergency in a teotwawki situation, I'll just have to pray and do my best. I'm sure that's what billions of people have to do right now, too.
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby TheLight » Wed Oct 06, 2010 9:57 pm

Oh I agree that having a hard copy is the way to go. Sometimes it's cheaper to download and print it, though. Many folks have access to binding machines through their places of employment and sometimes Kinko's isn't all that expensive.
I typically print this stuff out on my home laser printer, double sided, and put it in a three ring binder.
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby Who is John Gall » Thu Oct 07, 2010 10:25 am

TaffyJ, I think that you are definitely heading in the right direction. We are all ignorant of many, if not most things. The important thing is realizing that you are ignorant, deciding if you want to do something about it, and then working on rectifying that...and it sounds like you are headed on the right track there.

Regarding preparedness, you said that your children all have their vaccinations up to date, but what about you and your husband and any other adults in your family? Are your vaccinations up to date? I started to write a bunch of stuff here, but I think that I will put it up as a separate post.

Like the Light said, print them out and bind them. I have had great results with printing stuff out (usually at work...with my own paper, thank you) and bringing it to Kinkos for binding. I have not had good luck with printing double sided...I usually screw it up.
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby TaffyJ » Thu Oct 07, 2010 7:54 pm

Who is John Gall wrote:TaffyJ, I think that you are definitely heading in the right direction. We are all ignorant of many, if not most things. The important thing is realizing that you are ignorant, deciding if you want to do something about it, and then working on rectifying that...and it sounds like you are headed on the right track there.

Regarding preparedness, you said that your children all have their vaccinations up to date, but what about you and your husband and any other adults in your family? Are your vaccinations up to date? I started to write a bunch of stuff here, but I think that I will put it up as a separate post.

Like the Light said, print them out and bind them. I have had great results with printing stuff out (usually at work...with my own paper, thank you) and bringing it to Kinkos for binding. I have not had good luck with printing double sided...I usually screw it up.


Yes, me and the hubby and my mom are all up to date. I just renewed my tetanus and so did the hubby after he was bitten by a dog on his delivery route. I went to walgreens and got my mom her combo flu shot. Just in time, cause this week, our family has had the flu. Just like last year, it was mild. So, I'm not certain if we should still get the flu shot, or if we're good without it.

Hey, here's a freaky question for you med peeps...
If we're a generation or so along after teotwawki and we have grandkids, but there are no vaccinations, would it work to inject blood from a vaccinated adult with type O blood? Would Rh be a problem, or would it just not work? Or, since the human population would be thinned out, would diseases not be able to pass because of lack of sparse population and minimal mixing?
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby Who is John Gall » Fri Oct 15, 2010 1:46 pm

I would not risk a blood transfusion without the skill and equipment to thoroughly do a type and a cross match, except in the event of a true emergency where it is apparent that the person is going to die without some blood. That is actually the common practice now, to transfuse type O negative (universal donor) to patients in extremis as an emergency release from the blood bank if crossmatched blood is not immediately available.

The problem with blood is all of the different types. Not only is there the ABO types, and the Rh, but there are like two dozen other subtypes (MN, Duffy factor, etc). The biggest ones are the ABO types, but a serious, even fatal, reaction can occur with one of the subtypes. That is why we don't pull O neg into people unless they are likely to die if we don't...in that case the benefits outweigh the risk.

The Rh factors are a special story. These mostly come into play with pregnant women. Positive mean you got the factor, neg means you don't. A woman who is negative who carries a baby that is positive will get exposed to that baby's blood during delivery and will form antibodies against it. During a later pregnancy with another Rh positive baby, her immune system will attack the baby, likely leading to a miscarriage. This is the reason that women get the RhoGAM shots after delivery, if they are Rh negative...to keep their immune system in check and keep it from attacking future babies. Now, what if you give O positive blood to a hurt girl whose blood type is B neg? You will get the same result as if she had just delivered an Rh positive child...the next time that she is pregnant with an Rh positive baby her immune system will attack it. For this reason, O negative is considered the universal donor. However, in extreme circumstances, a male--or a female pass breeding age--can be given O positive blood in place of O negative for emergency transfusions. I have never seen this done.

As for the spread of disease, population density will decrease the spread of disease but would also make us more susceptible to diseases. Huh?

Many diseases require a certain population size in order to survive. For example, measles and smallpox require a population of something like 100,000 or more to sustain themselves (I forgot the exact numbers, but they are big). Other diseases, like chicken pox, have evolved so that they can persist with small groups (you get the chicken pox once and never get it again...later you get shingles and pass the chicken pox on to a new generation).

The problem with population size is that smaller populations who have been less exposed to disease are literally virgin populations, ready for a disease to come and strike them. A prime example of this is smallpox and measles in the Americas. In 15th century Europe, measles and smallpox were common. There were always some people around who had had the disease, were immune to it, and provided some herd immunity to the rest of the population (herd immunity: someone not immune to a disease is less likely to get it because the "herd" around him is immune to it). As a result, although outbreaks of smallpox and measles were bad, they were not a bad as they could have been. Now Columbus sails the ocean blue... In 1491 there were something like 90-110 million people in the Americas, by 1520 (ish) the number had dropped to 9-10 million people living from present day Alaska to the southern tip of Chile. Why? Mostly smallpox and measles...the native Americans had no natural immunity to it. Even those living in sparse tribes got it. Similar epidemics continued to break out in subsequent centuries: the pilgrims found whole villages empty after an outbreak (probably of Hepatitis A, which is usually a mild disease today). As a aside, the Native Americans got there own in by giving the Europeans a more virulent form of syphilis.

A really good, easy read on the subject is Jared Diamond's Arrow of Disease http://discovermagazine.com/1992/oct/th ... fdiseas137
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby mycomama » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:17 pm

I always enjoy reading about how things can be passed and the way different infectious diseases spread and react.Medical science always fascinates me when on paper. I realize that it would be a vastly different thing up close though so these sources would be a great way of educating yourself to help facilitate prevention. Thanks for the resources guys!
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby TaffyJ » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:31 pm

Who is...

Thanks so much for all that info. I was wondering that particular question because my hubby is O positive and I was hoping it would be possible to pass along some small immunity to future generations.

That was very thought provoking info about smallpox and measles and the native americans. Everything I learn here helps with my understanding of "the big picture". :clap:
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Re: Medical in the long emergency "Where there is no doctor

Postby Who is John Gall » Sat Oct 16, 2010 2:48 am

Your welcome, glad that I could help. Wish that I could paint a prettier picture, but...
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